Category Archives: Myths

Does the Alsea World Transformer S’uuku have a Siuslaw name?

Margin notes in old field notebooks occasionally offer important insights into the meaning of a word or story, and sometimes these notes raise questions. I found one of these puzzling questions completely by accident while looking for the field notes … Continue reading

Posted in Myths | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Sea Serpents

Sea Serpents appear in stories around the world – and not only in the ocean but in large lakes as well, perhaps most famously of contemporary ‘lake monster’ stories is “Nessie” of Loch Ness. All along the Pacific Northwest coast, … Continue reading

Posted in History, Myths | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Sagandas

First posted Dec. 17, 2011 There are a few mentions of a mysterious people called “Sagandas” or “Sik’andas”. There are few mentions of them, and only two recorded stories. The oldest story was recorded by Henry Hull St. Clair in … Continue reading

Posted in Myths | Tagged | Leave a comment

The Hollering Monster

First posted 4/26/18 Nok’élehe: the-person-that-halloos, the hollerer, the thing that hollers. The word is the same in both Hanis and Milluk, based on the verb k’el-or k’al-; to holler, to yell. The story of the nok’élehemight be one of the most-told stories recorded … Continue reading

Posted in Myths | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The Five Shadows

First published 9/27/17 Linguist Leo Frachtenberg came to Oregon just over a century ago, and worked with speakers of Hanis (Jim Buchanan, Frank Drew, Tom Hollis), Lower Umpqua/Siuslaw (Louisa and William Smith) and Alsea (William Smith). One of the stories … Continue reading

Posted in Myths | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Euchre Creek and The Octopus

First published 7/14/14 So usually I blog about CLUS stories but while poking around Harrington’s notes I found this curious story about Humbug Mountain and Euchre Creek.  The coast along Curry County is so beautiful, and I wanted to share … Continue reading

Posted in Myths | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The Young Man Who Stepped on Snail’s Back

First published October 30, 2012.  Annie Miner Peterson told the story of ‘The young man who stepped on Snail’s back’ some time in 1933 or 1934 in Milluk, and Melville Jacobs published it on page 54-56 of “Coos Narrative & … Continue reading

Posted in Myths | Tagged , | 2 Comments

“The Two Nouskilli Women”

This story was first posted October 2016.  In Frachtenberg’s work with Jim Buchanan, he translated nuuskilii as ‘giantesses’ or ‘the big women’, and he included three stories of them in his book “Coos Texts” (see sidebar). Frachtenberg got alternate versions in … Continue reading

Posted in Myths | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Pitch-Dress Ogress

This story was first posted in April 2013. I’ve added a little more material from that first post. Nuusgili (or nuusgili) is a Hanis and Milluk word that has been translated variously as ‘giantess’ or ‘ogress’. There is not much in the … Continue reading

Posted in Myths | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Wild Beings of the Wood

This was first published 2/4/13. The eshon (rhymes with the English word ‘ashen’) was a dangerous entity that lurked in lonely places in the hills.  They are distinct from the Giant People/Forest people written about yesterday, as they are not regarded as malevolent. … Continue reading

Posted in History, Myths | Tagged , | Leave a comment