Category Archives: vocabulary words

There’s more than one way to build a number (Milluk)

Five years ago I wrote a post about comparing the words for one thru five in Milluk, Hanis, Siuslaw, and Alsea, based on work by Eugene Buckley. (These languages have generally been supposed to be related). He saw some interesting … Continue reading

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Coalbank Slough

Looking through some archival materials uploaded by a friend, I found some notes I had not seen before taken down in the early 1930s by a man named Maloney that were included in Jacobs’ papers (a friend sent him a … Continue reading

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A Trickster fragment

When Melville Jacobs worked with Annie Peterson in 1933 and 1934, he got a long saga of five generations of tricksters (which was printed in his “Coos Myth Texts” printed by University of Washington Press in 1940). She also told … Continue reading

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Waterfalls and dams

Coyote went up the Coos River and made several small falls, everywhere he said not water enough. So he went finally to the Columbia River and made the big falls up there, he said there plenty of water. -Lottie Evanoff, … Continue reading

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Some curious “family” words

There are several words in Hanis and Milluk that can mean family, relatives. Some have other meanings beyond that – estis can also mean any crowd or group of people (in addition to ‘extended family’). Qahlalis also seems to mean extended family, … Continue reading

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“Pigeon-hawk”

In English, the common names for some bird species have changed a lot over the decades. In Frachtenberg’s Siuslaw word list (published in “Lower Umpqua Texts” in 1914) he has a word for ‘pigeon hawk’ – qsii’i. A quick google … Continue reading

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To Dive, Sink and the mystery suffix -m

So the previous post was about the Hanis and Milluk verb tk’wil– to dive, sink and dilm-to be sunk in the water. In Jim Buchanan’s “Nephew Story” aka “The Girl and the Sea Serpent” the verb tk’wil-appears two more times – and … Continue reading

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