Category Archives: vocabulary words

A Trickster fragment

When Melville Jacobs worked with Annie Peterson in 1933 and 1934, he got a long saga of five generations of tricksters (which was printed in his “Coos Myth Texts” printed by University of Washington Press in 1940). She also told … Continue reading

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Waterfalls and dams

Coyote went up the Coos River and made several small falls, everywhere he said not water enough. So he went finally to the Columbia River and made the big falls up there, he said there plenty of water. -Lottie Evanoff, … Continue reading

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Some curious “family” words

There are several words in Hanis and Milluk that can mean family, relatives. Some have other meanings beyond that – estis can also mean any crowd or group of people (in addition to ‘extended family’). Qahlalis also seems to mean extended family, … Continue reading

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“Pigeon-hawk”

In English, the common names for some bird species have changed a lot over the decades. In Frachtenberg’s Siuslaw word list (published in “Lower Umpqua Texts” in 1914) he has a word for ‘pigeon hawk’ – qsii’i. A quick google … Continue reading

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To Dive, Sink and the mystery suffix -m

So the previous post was about the Hanis and Milluk verb tk’wil– to dive, sink and dilm-to be sunk in the water. In Jim Buchanan’s “Nephew Story” aka “The Girl and the Sea Serpent” the verb tk’wil-appears two more times – and … Continue reading

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New word: dark (colors)

At this stage, I don’t find many new Hanis words. Found one last night, however, a new word for ‘dark’. In St Clair’s (1903) and Frachtenberg’s work (1909) with Hanis speakers Jim Buchanan and Tom Hollis, they recorded a verb … Continue reading

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“Dear Old Lady”: the tale of the suffix -sha

Leo Frachtenberg worked with Hanis speaker Jim Buchanan in 1909. As part of his work, he later published a grammar of Hanis. In it he noted a suffix -sha that is unusual in that unlike any other suffix in the … Continue reading

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