Tag Archives: Hanis

A pattern in plant terms?

Sometimes it is hard to tell if I am looking at an actual pattern in the language, or if it is just coincidence – an illusion. I recently puzzled out that –k’ acts as a diminutive in Hanis, and maybe … Continue reading

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Shared words between Siuslaw and the Coosan languages

Hanis, Miluk, Siuslaw and Alsea are all generally supposed to be related to one another, altho clearly Siuslaw and Alsea are someone more closely related to each other than to the Coosan languages. The relationship between Hanis and Miluk is … Continue reading

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Does Hanis have a diminutive?

Above: a kawol (pack basket) from Coos County (Phoebe Hearst museum collection, UC Berkeley) A diminutive is an affix that modifies a word to add the meaning ‘little’ or ‘cute’ or associated meanings like that. Siuslaw has a diminutive suffix … Continue reading

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A Nursery tale in Hanis?

Annie Peterson told to Jacobs this very short (only 10 lines long) ‘story’ that he recorded on page 9 of notebook 99. It doesn’t seem to be a part of a longer story, just an odd stand alone story. So … Continue reading

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A Trickster fragment

When Melville Jacobs worked with Annie Peterson in 1933 and 1934, he got a long saga of five generations of tricksters (which was printed in his “Coos Myth Texts” printed by University of Washington Press in 1940). She also told … Continue reading

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Some curious “family” words

There are several words in Hanis and Milluk that can mean family, relatives. Some have other meanings beyond that – estis can also mean any crowd or group of people (in addition to ‘extended family’). Qahlalis also seems to mean extended family, … Continue reading

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To Dive, Sink and the mystery suffix -m

So the previous post was about the Hanis and Milluk verb tk’wil– to dive, sink and dilm-to be sunk in the water. In Jim Buchanan’s “Nephew Story” aka “The Girl and the Sea Serpent” the verb tk’wil-appears two more times – and … Continue reading

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