Tag Archives: JP Harrington

Translations and meanings aren’t always settled: Rethinking the definition of kahlalis

First, I want to thank Troy Anderson for pointing me out to Milluk examples of a word I was looking for, kahlalis/qahlalis. While going through Jim Buchanan’s story of “Night Rainbow” I noticed a Hanis word, kahlalis, that Frachtenberg (who … Continue reading

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Hollow trees

Sorry for the long blog silence.  Been busy with other projects of late.  Thought I’d post a brief bit of vocabulary today. Working through Harrington’s notes, occasionally I find phrases that illuminate the workings of the native languages a bit … Continue reading

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Story of “The Flood”

So there a couple of versions of a Coos Bay great flood story.  There is a version published in Frachtenberg’s Coos Texts that he translated from Hanis Coos to English.  And a short version given years later by Lottie Evanoff … Continue reading

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More (mis?)adventures in word reconstruction…

So, in my preceding post I wrote about the trickiness of reconstructing vocabulary words from 19th century sources. In the 1934, there was a then-grad student named Philip Drucker who interviewed several Oregon coast Indians, including Frank Drew, Annie Miner … Continue reading

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Eddies and whirlpools

In going through Harrington’s notes searching for Hanis vocabulary for the dictionary, I have found many good words  -words for different fishes, birds, clouds and weather, and so forth. This is just a quick note on fun words made out … Continue reading

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More on the tides

So I had time while in Oregon to do research in Harrington’s notes, and find lots more words to add to the Hanis Coos dictionary. I also again found the word tl’uunii, high tide/the water is high. Turns out it … Continue reading

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Blue Clay blues

There were ‘clays’ used as paint.  Red ochre was the most widely used.  Usually it was found as a yellow clay deposit, then heated in fire to turn red.  Then it was mixed with marrow to use as a face … Continue reading

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