Tag Archives: Milluk

A Milluk name for Siuslaw River?

It’s common for a language group to have its own name for other people and rivers that’s different from what that other people call their own river or themselves. But in the case of the Siuslaw, the word I find … Continue reading

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A pattern in plant terms?

Sometimes it is hard to tell if I am looking at an actual pattern in the language, or if it is just coincidence – an illusion. I recently puzzled out that –k’ acts as a diminutive in Hanis, and maybe … Continue reading

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Shared words between Siuslaw and the Coosan languages

Hanis, Miluk, Siuslaw and Alsea are all generally supposed to be related to one another, altho clearly Siuslaw and Alsea are someone more closely related to each other than to the Coosan languages. The relationship between Hanis and Miluk is … Continue reading

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There’s more than one way to build a number (Milluk)

Five years ago I wrote a post about comparing the words for one thru five in Milluk, Hanis, Siuslaw, and Alsea, based on work by Eugene Buckley. (These languages have generally been supposed to be related). He saw some interesting … Continue reading

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Waterfalls and dams

Coyote went up the Coos River and made several small falls, everywhere he said not water enough. So he went finally to the Columbia River and made the big falls up there, he said there plenty of water. -Lottie Evanoff, … Continue reading

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Some curious “family” words

There are several words in Hanis and Milluk that can mean family, relatives. Some have other meanings beyond that – estis can also mean any crowd or group of people (in addition to ‘extended family’). Qahlalis also seems to mean extended family, … Continue reading

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To Dive, to sink, sunk in the water

Anyone who has ever studied another language realizes that it’s tricky translating from one language to another – there is so much variation between languages in terms of idioms, semantic domains of individual words (like in Russian they don’t have … Continue reading

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